Updated CX Journey Mapping Process Diagram

In association with the release of our latest CXJM workshop deck, here is an updated version of our CX Journey Mapping Process Diagram that reflects our latest refinements to the process.

This diagram is a simple one-page visual illustration of the five phases of the process and their associated steps.  Alongside each step is a visual reminder of which sticky note color is used, as well as an example entry.

Customer Journey Mapping Diagram

Download links: PDF or JPG

Key differences from our previous CXJM process steps:

1) The Persona, Brand Attributes & Key Trends have all been moved to the front  This provides a clearer overview of these three components, creating a better understanding of their overarching importance when building effective Journey Maps.

2) Teams select one moment need together & one emotional need as individuals This change helps teams quickly move towards brainstorming the core emotional drivers, which is a key skill we are trying to unlock with participants in our Journey Mapping workshops.

3) Desired new attitude & behavior now come before building CX Design Canvas We’ve found doing this step before brainstorming innovations really helps focus teams their ideas on things that truly meet the selected transformation impact.

All of these additions are also reflected within the slidedeck that can be found on the CXJM Toolkit page

Updated CX Journey Mapping Workshop Slides

We are excited to be rolling out our new and improved version of our CXJM workshop deck that reflects all the refinements we’ve made over the last 12 months. We’ve incorporated lots of your feedback and have used it to make our Journey Mapping methodology even more efficient and effective. This file can be downloaded as a PDF or as a PPT

New updates include:

  1. New slidedeck with improved formatting
  2. better examples throughout the deck
  3. refinements to Journey Mapping process

More details about the changes in our Journey Mapping process in in our overview of the CX Journey Map process diagram. 

New Roll-up CX Journey Mapping Poster

We’re excited to introduce a new way to facilitate great journey mapping sessions with a “roll up” version of our CX Journey Mapping boards. 

This new poster makes it easier to set up and run a CX Journey Mapping session. Instead of using large foam core boards, butcher paper, or some other medium, we put everything you need on one large poster.

This new poster provides:

  • The Jen/ZoomGo story line across the 3 posters
  • A map of the overall step by step CX Journey Mapping process (bottom left)
  • Dedicated areas for brainstorming needs, processes, & innovations
  • The CX Design Canvas, with color coding to simplify instruction
  • Clear designation of areas for On Stage, Back Stage, & Attitudes

Roll up Customer Journey Mapping Template

Like any good CX practitioner, we have piloted them, incorporated feedback, tested revised versions, and are now ready to share these more broadly.  We’ve found that not only does it speed up the set up for your session, but that it greatly improves the learning experience for the participants.   We’ve been using it it at our recent workshops and have found it to be an all around great experience.

Download Links:

CXJM Learn Workshop Templates:
ZoomGo Chapter 1 - ZoomGo Chapter 2  - ZoomGo Chapter 3

CXJM Design Session Template:
Blank DIY Roll Up Poster

Tips & Directions for use:

  • Print these on 42 inch by 96 inch paper  (can be re-sized to fit metric paper sizes)
  • Laminate it using a matte finish to reduce glare and improve longevity
  • We recommend 3M adhesives to mount it without damaging painted wall surfaces
  • Ensure you have enough contiguous wall space in your meeting location
  • You’ll still need to print out blank CX Hypothesis Statements for the final step in the workshop

Let us know what your think of these and please send us some pictures of you using them in action!

5 Tips For Building Great Customer Journey Maps

We’ve spent the last 2 years building Customer Experience Journey Maps with clients all over the world. During that time we’ve learned a lot of great information about how to maximize the value and effectiveness of your Journey Mapping activities.

Here are 5 quick Journey Mapping tips we’ve collected in our work:

 

1) Start small (be assumptive)

Start Small

It can be easy to get bogged down by trying to build the perfect Journey Map. Be careful to not let the scope of your activity overwhelm you. We recommend starting things out assumptivly with low resolution when creating your initial Journey Maps. From there you can perform validation exercises on the areas that require more detail to understand.

 

2) Keep it collaborative (cross-functional)

cross functional

Journey mapping provides the most value when done with a wide range of people from your organization.This will help maximize your collective understanding during this activity.

 

Here are some examples of people to consider including:

    • Someone with a good understanding of strategic business objectives and financials
    • Someone who knows the arch of the sales relationship
    • Someone who understands CRM system and email marketing touchpoints
    • Someone with insight into product direction and development
    • Someone from front-line customer support


3) Build initial Journey Maps in person

in personWhenever possible, we strongly recommend creating your maps as a collocated activity. Journey Mapping requires high energy, collaborative decision making and heavy focus.  For these reasons, teams who do their initial mapping activities in person tend to gain greater value from their efforts.

 

4) Use consistent sticky note colors

colorsThis may seem trivial, but using a consistent color pallet will maximize your ability to gain rapid understanding from viewing a Journey Map. This will help everyone gain a clear understanding of the layout at a quick glance.

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5) Make your Journey Maps visible

visibleIt’s no secret that Journey Maps draw attention. These maps can serve as a great reference point for bringing different stakeholders up to speed on your efforts. We recommend placing your maps on the hallway walls, in meeting rooms, or anywhere else that will get them seen by passerby’s.

Hopefully these tips are helpful for you. We’d love to hear some other suggestions you have for building great Customer Experience Journey Maps in the comments below.

An Overview of Journey Mapping from the Stanford d.school

Check out this cool 6 minute explanation of Journey Mapping created by our friends at the Stanford d.school.  By using the relatable experience of visiting a coffee shop, this video serves as a great way to quickly share the value of Journey Mapping with people around your organization.

We’ve had an ongoing collaboration with the d.school and love the work they do. If you like this video, I highly recommend you check out their site for some great materials around design thinking.

Five Questions with Brian Raboin of HOSTING

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Brian RaboinWe’ve had the privilege of collaborating with Brian Raboin, the Chief Strategy Officer of managed cloud services provider HOSTING, over the last year. His enthusiasm for discussing the importance of customer experience is contagious. In the best possible way.

Here, Brian shares some of his insight into why a customer-centered strategy has been a winning formula for HOSTING.

Brian, we know you’re kind of a big deal in customer experience strategy circles these days. Tell us a little bit about yourself. When you’re not setting CX strategy, where might we find you? Favorite superhero?

I’ll try and make this short. It was a Tuesday in 1971. It was raining. I was born in Delaware because I wanted to be close to my mother. “I was born at a very young age.” – Groucho Marx.

I live in Denver, Colorado with my wife and two children. I left the uncertainty of a corporate job with McDonald’s to join the stability of a start-up in 2001 when I joined HostMySite as the fifth employee. Fast-forward to today and HOSTING is the integrated combination of three companies – HostMySite, NeoSpire, and HOSTING. When I am not focusing on CX Strategy or talking about building a Service Culture, I enjoy doing things to make my colleagues, family and friends laugh. Currently my office window is a real life replica of level 1-1 from Mario Brothers. I also make balloon animals for people’s anniversaries and birthdays.

As for my favorite superhero, I would have to say Iron Man. I saw a graphic once where Clark Kent says, “No one must ever know who I really am.” Bruce Wayne says, “To protect my city, I must wear a mask.” Peter Parker says, “No one can ever know my secret.” And Tony Stark says, “Screw it, I’m Iron Man.” I like that Tony innovates and is iterative in the process. He always has different versions of the Iron Man suit that he is working on and takes successful ideas and applies them in different ways. He learns from the failures, and the failures just make him want to do even better. He is also uber-rich and drives some pretty awesome cars.

You’ve recently taken up the position of Chief Strategy Officer at HOSTING. Could you tell us a bit about your position and the role CX plays when setting your corporate strategy?

My new role as Chief Strategy Officer is to take a lot of what we have done internally with regards to building a service culture and to turn that outside-in through thought leadership and activation leadership. For example, using CX Journey Mapping (CXJM) and measuring the true impact on an organization from a revenue standpoint is critical in determining the overall success of the process. But for a process like CXJM to be successful, an organization needs to know its vision, values, culture, brand, customers, market, and competition. Getting those pieces in place is critical for companies today to build a good customer experience.

My role is to get those pieces in place for HOSTING and then effectively innovate around the customer experience not just at the product level, but also from initial engagement through the entire customer life cycle. The questions I try to answer are how can we innovate for the customer at all levels to show our vision, values, culture and brand? How do we know that our vision, values, culture and brand are valued by our target customer and market segment? What new markets will find our offerings distinctly valuable compared to the competition? What are the customer’s problems, needs, desires, passions and goals that we can satisfy? And how do we do it in a distinctive way that our target market and customers will find valuable?

To that end, I am writing, talking, workshopping (I just made up that word) and activating not only HOSTING, but other companies, so that they can build their own service culture and customer experience.

You’ve been a great partner of ours over the last year, sharing your experiences using CX Journey Mapping (CXJM). What was it about CXJM that really resonated with you and your teams?

Why thank you! You have been a great partner as well.

What really clicked for us with CXJM was the idea of telling a customer story and the uniqueness of the innovations that fell out of those stories. CXJM re-focused us not only on value, but on the problem and on the customer need. It made the customer come to life for us and allowed us to experience things from a first person perspective.

We used to write Agile user stories like,

“As the customer, I want to see a backup log, so I know my backups have run and when.”

After CXJM, we started writing,

“As Bobby, the System Admin who works 60 hours a week and is on-call 24×7, I want to know if, when and why a backup failed and have a say as to when it will run again. Because if it runs at the wrong time during the day and causes the application to slow down, my phone is going to ring off the hook and my email is going to blow up, and I’ll spend hours trying to figure out what the hell is going on, pulling my hair out, while people are yelling at me thinking I am incompetent. Only then to learn HOSTING automatically re-ran the backup without me knowing.  And when that happens, I will hate HOSTING with the heat of a thousand suns.”

The old user story delivered functionality that gave visibility into the backup process. The new user story using CXJM solved for the problem of an overworked, on-call System Admin who doesn’t want to get yelled at more than he already does. Solving for the latter brings so much more value than just building the former. CXJM allowed us to really get outside of the box when it came to solving problems where both the customer and the company benefited. We are now writing stories that will create an experience that will move customers to be advocates. Not everything you do will make a customer an advocate, but CXJM helps identify the points of frustration as well as opportunities to build advocacy.

One overlooked aspect I think a lot of people miss when doing CXJM for the first time is that while the ideas are out of the box, the best and most effective ideas and innovations are ones that not only support, but propel and push forward, a company’s vision, value, culture and brand. At HOSTING, we want our brand to be about “Serve” and “Guide”, which are the two things we always want to be doing for our customers. The innovations that come from our teams while using CXJM always push us towards more unique ways to serve and guide our customers.

Tell us a bit more about how you’re using CX design principles to create engaged employees within HOSTING.

For HOSTING, CXJM brought all parts of the company together to get a wide, horizontal view of the entire customer experience. CXJM works best for us when we can bring together a microcosm of our entire organization to build and experience the customer journey together. The innovations then come from any part of the organization and it brings a much deeper understanding as to what the customer really experiences. It also gets people involved in the success of the innovations who otherwise wouldn’t be involved or interested.  Now, we have Billing and Accounting people really interested in what Engineering and Operations are doing because they were a part of the creation of an innovation. It has blasted cannon balls into the silos of our organization, and that is a good thing.

Like Tony Stark who tries successful ideas in new ways, I wanted to see how CXJM could be applied elsewhere. So we are going to be Journey Mapping the employee experience at HOSTING to see where we can make that experience even better. This is important to me as part of our vision is having the “industry’s best team.” To attract the best team, we have to have an experience that will get people lined up at the door to come work at HOSTING.  We have done a lot this year to make that happen. We built a bar at the office in Denver that is always stocked with beer, wine and other adult beverages. This is important to me personally as I am taking over HR and Training with the goal of creating an awesome employee experience. Frankly, I only have a couple of tricks in my bag (CXJM being one of them) so I really hope it helps me in HR and Training. Incidentally, we also hired a full time lawyer. Despite the outward appearance, the bar and the lawyer are not correlated. However me taking over HR and the lawyer are.

Many companies understand that CX is the new business imperative, but struggle to find a place to start. Could you share any guidance or tips to help businesses build alignment and confidence to start a CX transformation?

The secret to our success in CX transformation was to just start. There is a book by Ari Weinzweig, the co-founder of a company called Zingerman’s, called “Zingerman’s Guide to Giving Great Service”. He lists five steps to building a service culture. Step one is Teach It, and step two is Define It. When I first saw that I thought it was odd that they were in that order, and not the other way around. But the genius of teaching before defining hit me quickly. Transformation requires movement, energy, collaboration and action. The physical act of teaching involves movement, energy, collaboration and action. Also, teaching first makes you commit. Last year, we put December 10-11, 2012, on the calendar on for me to teach a class on customer service. We called it WOW training. When that invite went out to 10 people at HOSTING, including our CEO, COO, CTO and seven other people, I had no idea what I was going to talk about or do for two days. But I knew I had to do something. Six months later, the entire company had been through WOW training. We are now doing WOW 2.0 and Manager WOW, as well as CXJM Workshops, How to Hire a Rock Star Workshops, and Giving Reviews that Matter Workshops.

The other part of teaching first and defining second is that it allows the culture of the company to help define it. Find people that are passionate about CX and Service.  Passionate people like to talk about their passion. Oracle and the folks that work on Oracle CX offered me the opportunity to attend free CXJM workshops and support. I took unashamed advantage of every opportunity that was presented in front of me to learn from the CX folks at Oracle. I did buy them beer on occasion, which seemed to keep me top of mind when opportunities arose. With a little homework and an attitude of not taking no for an answer, you can find people who have done it before. And they will talk to you for free and teach you a ton – just because it is their passion. Just like every journey, CX transformation all starts with taking a first step. Just take it and keep going.

CX Journey Mapping Coaching Guidelines

When we run a CX Journey Mapping session, there are two main roles that run the session:

(1) the Facilitator
(2) the Coach(es)

The more obvious role is that of the Facilitator, the lead speaker who directs the journey mapping activity. But we’ve found that the role of the Coach is equally, in some cases more, important in ensuring the mapping process is completed effectively.

A Coach works with each individual group of mappers (four to six people per group is the magic number), guiding them through each step of the activity. The Coach largely follows the direction of the Facilitator, but also plays a more hands-on role with the members of the group: repeating/explaining instructions, contributing ideas if the group feels blocked, and keeping everyone engaged and enthused.

We feel it’s a critical role to ensure the activity runs smoothly, and would highly encourage you to include Coaches when you do your mapping.

To help the Coaches guide their groups effectively, I created a set of Coaching Guidelines. There are quite a few steps to our entire journey mapping process, and remembering the key elements of each step takes a lot of practice.

These guidelines outline each step of the process, and provide two or three simple tips for the Coach to emphasize at each step. There are also a few general tips for keeping the group focused and interested in the overall process.

coaches_guidelines

The format of this document (three pages of somewhat longhand instructions) probably lends itself more to pre-session preparation than quick reference during the session. But I’d be curious to hear your feedback after trying it out. A “pocket-sized” Coaches cheat sheet might be cool too, and more easily referenced while mapping.

The Coaching Guidelines document is part of our CX Journey Mapping Toolkit. Good luck Coaches and happy mapping!

CX Journey Mapping Process Diagram

At the end of each CX Journey Mapping Workshop that we run, we hold a brief retrospective, asking attendees to give us feedback. We read every bit of this feedback and use it to improve future sessions.

One common piece of feedback our attendees wish for is the ability to see & understand where in the Journey Mapping process we were as we moved through the workshop.

So, I set out to create a simple, one-page visual illustration of the five phases of the process, along with each phase’s activity steps. Alongside each step there is a visual reminder of which sticky note color is used, also showing an example entry for that step.

CXJM process guide

We now show this graphic at the beginning of the workshop, explaining the five phases that we’re about to tackle. And then during the workshop, we’ll bring it back up to highlight what we’ve just completed, and preview where we’re going next. It serves as a good reminder for not only the workshop attendees, but also the Facilitator in explaining the progression of the steps.

It also stands-alone as a good one page handout. The PDF version is available on the Journey Mapping Toolkit page.

Newly Updated CX Journey Mapping Kit

Over the last few months we’ve advanced many elements of our CX Journey Mapping Toolkit, so wanted to update the kit and share the latest versions with you here.

It’s exciting to note that, for the first time, many of the new ideas and updates didn’t originate from our core team. Rather, we’ve complemented our team’s work by curating the most effective improvements and innovations developed by our growing bench of global facilitators.

Because we advocate a culture of testing new workshop material along with workshop retrospectives, our collective body of CX Design tools and techniques is improving at an every increasing rate. Impressive.

Special thanks to Adam Miller, for leading the effort on this. You’ll hear from him shortly explaining this latest collection in further detail.

Until then, I simply wanted to call your attention again to the dedicated CX Journey Mapping Toolkit Page, and highlight what’s new and improved.

Here is what’s new:

Everything you need to introduce your teams to these techniques and lead your own journey mapping session, is packaged up for you. We look forward to hearing how they work for you.

 

Introducing our CX Design Team

As DesigningCX continues to grow, one of the things I mentioned wanting to do was introduce you to my co-conspirators — the small rogue team behind our CX Design efforts to date.

My reason for this is simple: it’s time to weave more voices and points of view into the conversation here. First you’ll start to hear more directly from the rest of our team. And then, soon, we hope to share stories from our favorite CX Practitioners and Innovators globally.

As such, I’d like you to meet my CX Design colleagues: Brian, Mike, Adam, and Matthew.

Brian Curran  .  [ LinkedIn profile ]

I first met Brian when he joined RightNow (after RightNow acquired my social software startup). He led the Web Experience business for CX, and I ran the Social Experience business. Then, when RightNow became a part of Oracle, we combined forces and co-founded the CX Strategy & Design program.

What’s been exciting about our collaboration, is that we bring different but incredibly complementary backgrounds and points of view to the CX table. We’re both impostors in Enterprise Software: Brian is a serial intrapreneur and I’m a serial entrepreneur. He lives and breathes large organizations, redesigning and transforming businesses to be customer-centric; while I’m most at home in startups using customer-centered design to create new businesses from scratch. Most of what you’ve seen come to life in our CX workshops, tools, and techniques is a hybridization of Brian’s and my innovation approaches, methods, tips, and tricks: a tight marriage of solid business-performance design and human-centered design, that simultaneously considers both business value and customer value.

If you’ve had the chance to meet Brian, you know he’s a singularity — a leading CX change-agent inside and outside Oracle. By way of background, Brian has led customer experience transformations at multiple leading brands (including Best Buy) and has the scars and accolades to prove it. On a personal note: Brian has traveled all over the world, has lived numerous fascinating lives, loves good food and espresso (though really doesn’t need the caffeine), and currently calls DC home. I encourage you to connect with him directly on LinkedIn.

You’ll begin to hear more and more from Brian directly, not just speaking on stage or leading workshops globally, but as a principal contributor to this site going forward.

Mike Alber  .  [ LinkedIn profile ]

I’ve worked with Mike for nearly 7 years, as he was the first community manager at my social software startup’s first customer. Mike is a social media guru with expertise in agile development, and a background in marketing. We had the good fortune of recruiting Mike to RightNow after we were acquired, and he subsequently coached clients globally on their social media and brand community strategies and practices.

Last year, Mike bravely joined the founding CX Design team at Oracle, where he helped develop the first version of our CXJM workshop curriculum. As the first CX Design Coach, he has led teams and trained facilitators globally. In the process, Mike has been instrumental in figuring out how to kit-up and pop-up workshops all over the world. And, given his background and expertise, it’s no surprise that he also leads our social and content strategy for DesigningCX.

On a personal note: Mike is a Boulder native, hip-hop and micro-brew aficionado, and snowboarding savant. So if you’re visiting the Rockies and looking for someone to help you design a compelling Boulder experience, Mike’s your guy.

Adam Miller  .  [ LinkedIn profile ]

I’ve had the privilege of working with Adam since our startup days, and through two back-to-back acquisitions. Adam has built his career in client-facing leadership roles, and as a result, he naturally brings a customer-centered perspective to any initiative, along with attention to detail, and poise under pressure. Adam is one of those rare individuals who’s able to navigate uncertainty with certainty.

As our global workshop program lead, Adam adeptly collaborates with regional teams to architect and conduct CX Design Workshops, as well as equip and coordinate workshop teams around the world. If Adam is involved, you know that everything and everyone will run like clockwork, regardless of whether he’s dropped in Tokyo, Singapore, Manila, Shanghai, London, or San Francisco. When he’s not supporting global teams, he’s likely hosting strategic clients in Boulder or facilitating boot camps.

On a personal note: Adam came to Boulder for university and never left. His dog’s name is Fenway, so you can deduce where he hails from. Even so, he’s fully acclimated to mile-high culture and living; he savors fine food and wine, and earns it as an avid mountain and road cyclist, runner and hiker.

Matthew Price  .  [ LinkedIn profile ]

The newest member of our team is Matthew. He joined to help advance our Workshop program, as more and more folks around the world move from learning CX Design techniques towards applying them.

Matthew is no foreigner to a global role; having managed teams on three continents before (Australia, Brazil, US), he has long had an international focus. And, having spent time in startups and big companies alike — working on new technologies, with packaged goods, even on factory floors — he thrives in diverse and dynamic environments. As such, he is able to intuitively relate to and capably coach the incredible range of organizations we encounter globally.

On a personal note: though he has spent most of his career in the Pacific Northwest, he recently traded rain for the Rockies, and now is a proud resident of Montana. And there, you’ll find him wakeboarding, mountain biking, or just hanging out with the family.

So, keep and eye out.  Soon, you’ll begin hearing more and more from Brian, Mike, Adam, and Matthew.