CX Journey Mapping Toolkit

On this page, you’ll find all of the CX Journey Mapping tools, materials, and guides that we’re developing — everything you need to introduce your teams to this powerful approach for customer-centered action and CX innovation.

Setup

  1. Journey Mapping Suppliessupplies list (pdf)  [ original blog post ]
  2. Supplies CalculatorExcel version  [ original blog post ]
  3. Journey Mapping Board Standsparts list (pdf)  [ original blog post ]

Materials

  1. CX Journey Mapping Slides w/ZoomGo Story - presentation (pdf) (ppt, 40mb)
  2. ZoomGo Journey Mapping Storyline - Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3 (pdfs)
  3. ZoomGo Financial Scenarios financials (pdf)
  4. CX Design Canvas - zoomgo canvas (pdf), blank canvas (pdf)  [ original blog post ]
  5. CX Design Hypothesis Statement - worksheet (pdf)  [ original blog post ]
  6. Tabletop CX Journey Map Template - Blank Template 24″ x 36″ (pdf)
  7. Roll Up CX Journey Map Poster – Blank Template (pdf)

Guides

  1. Crash Course in CX Journey Mappingcourse (pdf)  [ original blog post ]
  2. CX Journey Mapping Coaching Guidelines - guide (pdf)
  3. CX Journey Mapping Facilitator’s Timing Guide - guide (xls)  [ original blog post ]
  4. 1-page CX Journey Mapping Process diagram - PDF or JPG

 

And finally, for reference here are a few of our favorite example customer journey maps:

 

20 thoughts on “CX Journey Mapping Toolkit

  1. When you introduce clients to customer journey mapping who have been ignoring customer perceptions and feelings, at what stage would you introduce the client’s drivers into the exercise?
    I am thinking about whether CJM should be a clean “stand in the shoes of the customer ” before the interests of the client come into consideration.
    With zoom go was the focus on Jen only and her journey with interventions driven by making Jen happy or were the drivers of the company included in the mix?

  2. Hi Jennie,

    We do recommend doing a clean “stand in the customer’s shoes” exercise before introducing the company priorities. It can be cumbersome to map the full arch of a long customer journey – so company priorities (acquisition, retention and/or efficiency) will often help dictate what section to focus on specifically.

    With the Zoomgo story, we do include company priorities (via Financial Impact sticky notes) into the mix, but only after we map out Jen’s emotions and vote on her high and low points. From there we use both perspectives (Jen and Zoomgo) to determine the ‘moment that matters’. This selection is often done in a place where the priorities of both parties match (i.e. this is a low point for Jen, and is also a place where Zoomgo can intervene to impact an important financial impact metric).

    Appreciate your comments on the blog! Let us know if you have any other questions.

    -Mike Alber (CX Design Strategy Manager, Oracle)

  3. Glad to hear Parmeswar! We had a lot of fun working with everyone at the workshop yesterday. Look forward to seeing how you will integrate these tools into your business. Please reach out if you have any questions and/or to give us an update on your progress.
    -Mike

  4. Hi,

    This was a great session, something which was not the same old marketing event. Glad I made it to the event and attended it. Appreciate the time and effort taken behind this program.
    Would want to design this to be more industry specific and just pure customer mapping.

    Regards,
    Aniruddha

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  7. A critical part of this process is identifying the impacts or the financial metrics we can influence thru the changes we implement. It seems to me, and was the case during the workshop, that you aren’t able to determine what to impact and how until you go thru the CJM process and identify gaps and opportunities. If that’s the case, how can I make a good business case for CJM before I go thru it? I’m assuming I have to use case studies or more generalized benefits realized by orgs that have put an emphasis on CX in general, and say that we’re almost certain to find more specific financial metrics but we need to go thru this process to ID what they are.

    Thanks for any insight you can provide.

    • Josh, that is a fantastic question and a lot like the one about the chicken and the egg. If the question is about the investment of time and resources to do a CXJM then I believe that it is a combination of a leap of faith and an understanding that there is a direct correlation between delivering better experiences and driving better results. You can find that proof everywhere !
      What I am advocating is that CXJM is one of the best ways (but not the only way) to get empathy around the attitudes and behaiors of your customers while at the same time reducing the drag that functional silos cause in your business. The process gets everyone on the same page and focused on issues and opportunities allowing the customer to fulfill their needs at both a journey and emotional level. I think that it is intuitive that a value equation exists that if we do a better job fulfilling our customers needs at a meaningful and emotional level that they will in turn return incremental value back to our company .
      My recommendation to you is to start small. Just try this methodology on something that has a small scope and see if it helps you get more clarity on diagnosing and innovating that can produce a prototype or pilot of a new experience that you can execute in a test and control environment.
      Let us know how it goes and please let us know how we can help.

  8. Hi,
    when embarking upon a CJ design, I stumble upon the question who to involve in the (first) mapping of the journey: product design? marketing? front line employees?
    Is it wise to check the journey with a client or is the added value there limited?
    thank you!

    • Hi Katrin,

      When building journey maps, it is great to have a cross-functional group of people. The Types of people you mention are great to include. Someone from Product Design who has a strong knowledge of the development direction, someone from Marketing who has details on CRM system and email touchpoints. A customer support manager who understands your support workflow. An Account Manager who understands the arch of your sales relationships. A Front line Employee who knows the recurring issues customers are dealing with.

      Regarding your other question, It can be valuable to validate your journey maps with a client (though it’s not necessarily something you NEED to do everytime). You are going to make a lot of assumptions when building these maps, so talking with a customer can certainly help ensure you are headed in the right direction.

      I hope this is helpful.
      -Mike

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  10. I have been through a couple of Journey Mapping workshops before.
    This was by far, the most engaging and effective. I am taking with me, the tools to repeat this for a couple of identified customer journeys…and hopefully innovate to make the experience much better to bring in better NPS and increase retenstion and cross-sell :-)

  11. For budgeting purposes can anyone provide a cost estimate for purchasing all materials and supplies required to complete the CX Journey Mapping Toolkit with a group of 50 participants? Thank you in advance.

  12. Colleagues, Apologies, have I missed where the actual human-centered (prior, current or potential customer) qualitative and quantitative data came from, that helped inform and populate this map? Was it presented and discussed by the participants before the actual mapping activity?

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